Proposal Synopsis (Proposal ID# 42090726)

Return to your Presenter Menu
Delete this Proposal
(requires confirmation)
 

Category/Subcategory Selection

[ view/edit this section ]
    Category/Subcategory Session -- Lecture
 

General Information

[ view/edit this section ]
    Session Title Passion and Professional Development: Four Philosophies For Lead Learners
    Session Description A passionate student is a learning student. The same is true for teachers. Engage participants emotionally and unleash their passions, even in a technology workshop.
    Theme and Strand Professional Learning:Professional Development
    Keywords read/write, two-way, web 2.0
    Primary URL http://edtechlife.com/necc2008/
    Exhibitor Status
    Commercial Content
    Audience Type Chief Technology Officers
Curriculum Specialists
Library Media Specialists
Principals
Staff Developers
Superintendents
School Board Members
Teachers
Teacher Educators
Technology Coordinators
Technology Facilitators
Technology Integration Specialists
    Audience Level All
    NETS•S 1- 6
    NETS•T I- VI
    NETS•A I- VI
 

Proposal Summary

[ view/edit this section ]
    Purpose & Objectives The purpose of this session is to help participants become more effective professional developers by sharing ways they can engage their own participants on an emotional level and aim to unleash their own participants’ passions. To this end, four philosophies will be shared: the lead learner philosophy, the face-to-face philosophy, the “and life” philosophy, and the “kindergarten” philosophy. (For more details on each of these, see the outline below). The presenter will also share tools and tips for using technology to engage participants emotionally and to tap into their passions. This is a fast paced and interactive session meant to provide inspiration and direction, not detailed how-to instructions. This is a fast paced and interactive session meant to provide inspiration and direction, not detailed how-to instructions.

OBJECTIVES:

Participants will be able to...

- Articulate each of the four philosophies presented: the lead learner philosophy, the face-to-face philosophy, the “and life” philosophy, and the “kindergarten” philosophy.
- Share an example of how they might put each philosophy into action in their next presentation or workshop.
- Explain how technology, particularly two-way web technologies, can be used support these four philosophies.
- Share an example of how they might use a two-way web technology to support these four philosophies in their next presentation or workshop.
- Return to their classroom (or office) inspired to put these philosophies into action and to explore two-way web tools that might compliment them.

    Outline A passionate student is a learning student, and the same is true for teachers. If you are leading a professional development event, be sure to engage participants on an emotional level – aim to unleash their passions. These four philosophies can help.

The Lead Learner Philosophy: Don’t think of yourself as a trainer or instructor. Think of yourself as a Lead Learner. After all, the best leaders are also learners. There is wisdom in a Native American proverb, “He who learns from one who is learning, drinks from a flowing river.” Be passionate about what you are learning (and the session you are leading). Enthusiasm is contagious.

The Face-to-Face Philosophy: In today’s world of blogs and podcasts, information transmission is no longer an excuse for a face-to-face meeting. It’s a terrible waste. Respect the participants in your session by tapping into their experience, their passions, and their creative energy. Include many opportunities for interaction in your agenda, and provide links where they can access “how-to” details after the session.

The “and Life” Philosophy: Pets and babies help more teachers learn about technology than any trainer. Don’t hesitate to connect with participants’ lives outside of school. Invite them to share ways they can use what they are learning for personal goals. Also, remember they need to care about whatever they are learning – it needs to be relevant to their work, and ultimately, their life.

The Kindergarten Philosophy: Each positive experience a student has in kindergarten is a $1 deposit in their ‘love of learning’ bank, but every negative experience is a $10 withdrawal. Be sure your participants enjoy your session, even if it means moving slowly. Also, be sure participants “practice with a purpose.” Remember, your job is still to help them be the best people they can be.

This session will begin with an interactive welcome activity. During this activity, participants will be asked to share what they like most about teaching... and about being a student. The presenter will facilitate a brief discussion around the participants’ passions related to teaching and learning. Then the presenter will introduce the four philosophies summarized above. Participants will then be asked to share an example of how they might put each philosophy into action in their next presentation or workshop. In the next segment of the workshop, participants will be introduced to two-way web technologies (such as blogs, various forms of online chat, social networking, social microblogging with twitter, and even Google Docs) can be used to support these four philosophies. Again, participants will be asked to share an example of how they might use a two-way web technology to support these four philosophies in their next presentation or workshop. Before concluding the session, the presenter will leave participants with a few final tips for how they can integrate these philosophies and technologies into their own presentations and workshops. Finally, an interactive reflection activity will close the session.

Note that this content would be appropriate for use in a k-12 or higher ed classroom as well as in professional development situations.

OUTLINE (with approximate times):

Welcome Activity (~10 min)

Four Philosophies For Lead Learners (~7.5 min)
Participants Share Ways They Could Implement The Philosophies (~10 min)

Technologies to Support The Philosophies (~7.5 min)
Participants Share Ways They Could Implement These Technologies (~10 min)

Final Professional Development Tips (~5 min)
Reflection Activity (~10 min)

Interactive Elements: This was not submitted as a bring your own laptop session because a laptop is not necessary. However, participants with their own laptop will be able to take advantage of many additional interactive elements. Presentation of concepts and examples will take place using a Google Docs presentation and a wiki. Participants will be able to chat synchronously throughout the session using the Google presentation, and they will be able to post and share their own examples (and questions) on the wiki both during and after the session. In addition, the presentation and wiki urls will be posted to twitter (and at edtechlife.com) so that educators and professional developers from around the world (including those in attendance elsewhere in the conference) will be able to contribute their insights in the chat and on the wiki as well. If the network connection in the room permits, the audio (or video) of the session will also be webcast so that the virtual attendees can hear (and see) what is happening in the room. In addition to modeling passion in professional development, this session will model teaching and learning in a permeable classroom.

    Supporting Research BOOKS

Evans, R. (1996). The human side of school change: reform, resistance, and the real-life
problems of innovation. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass.

DuFour, R., Eaker, R. (1998). Professional learning communities at work: best practices
for enhancing student achievement. Bloomington, IN: Solution Tree.

DuFour, R., Eaker, R., & DuFour, R., (Eds.). (2005). On common ground: the power of
professional learning communities. Bloomington, IN: Solution Tree.

DuFour, R., DuFour, R., & Eaker, R. (2006). Professional learning communities at work
plan book. Bloomington, IN: Solution Tree.

DuFour, R., DuFour, R., Eaker, R., & Karhanek, G., (Ed.). (2004). Whatever it takes:
how professional learning communities respond when kids don’t learn.
Bloomington, IN: Solution Tree.

Eaker, R., DuFour R., & DuFour, R. (2002). Getting started: reculturing schools to
become professional learning communities. Bloomington, IN: National
Educational Service.

Fullan, M. (1993). Change forces: probing the depth of educational reform. New York:
RoutledgeFalmer.

Fullan, M. (1999). Change forces: the sequal. New York: Taylor & Francis Group.

Fullan, M. (2001b). Leading in a culture of change. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass.

Fullan, M. (2001a). The new meaning of educational change. (3rd edition). New York:
Teachers College Press.

Fullan, M. (2003a). Change forces with a vengeance. New York: RoutledgeFalmer.

Fullan, M. (2003b). The moral imperative of leadership. Thousand Oaks, Ca: Corwin
Press.

Fullan, M. (2005a). Leadership and sustainability. Thousand Oaks, Ca: Corwin
Press.

Fullan, M. (2005b). Professional learning communities writ large. In DuFour, R., Eaker,
R. & DuFour, R. (Eds.), On common ground: the power of professional learning
communities (pp. 209-224). Bloomington, IN: Solution Tree.

Fullan, M., Hill, P., & Crevola, C. (2006). Breakthrough. Thousand Oaks, Ca: Corwin
Press.

Hord, S. M. (Ed.). (2004). Learning together, leading together: changing schools through
professional learning communities. New York: Teachers College Press.

Huffman, J. B. & Hipp, K. K. (2003). Reculturing schools as professional learning
communities. Lanham, MD: Scarecrow Education.

Senge, P. M. (1990). The fifth discipline: the art and practice of the learning
organization. New York: Currency Doubleday.

Senge, P. M., Cambron-McCabe, N., Lucas, T., Smith, B., Dutton, J., & Kleiner, A.
(2000). Schools that learn: a fifth discipline fieldbook for educators, parents, and
everyone who cares about education. New York: Currency Doubleday

Senge, P., Kleiner, A., Roberts, C., Ross, R., Roth, G., & Smith, B. (1999). The dance of
change: the challenges to sustaining momentum in learning organizations. New
York: Currency Doubleday.

Senge, P. M., Kleiner, A., Roberts, C., Ross, R., & Smith, B. (1994). The fifth discipline
fieldbook: strategies and tools for building a learning organization. New York:

Stone, R., & Cuper, P. H. (2006). Best practices for teacher leadership: what award-
winning teachers do for their professional learning communities. Thousand Oaks,
Ca: Corwin Press.

WEBSITES AND RECOGNIZED EXPERTS

This session is also built upon seven years of experience leading professional development sessions - and a decade of learning from other professional developers in education. Also it rests on a foundation of over three years reading and writing blogs, subscribing to RSS feeds, social bookmarking, social networking with educators, and following my peers and colleagues on twitter. I am indebted to many for what I have learned about professional development. Please see my public blogroll at http://www.bloglines.com/public/markdouglaswagner for a list of websites and recognized experts that have influenced development of the material in this proposal. See also my work at edtechlife.com for documentation of what I have learned in over three years of active blogging.

    Presenter Background Formerly a high school English teacher, Mark has since served as an educational technology coordinator at the site, district, and county levels. He now serves as the president of the Educational Technology and Life Corporation, which provides professional development and consulting services to schools, districts, and other educational institutions. Mark has a master’s degree in cross-cultural education. He is also working towards a PhD in Educational Technology at Walden University, and expects to complete his dissertation in the fall of 2007.

He is passionate about professional development and about these four philosophies. In addition, he enjoys helping teachers learn how read/write web tools, such as those mentioned in this session, can transform their teaching and their own professional development. He has led professional development workshops at numerous schools, districts, conferences, and other events, including online workshops. He is also an avid edublogger at edtechlife.com.

 

Equipment Information

[ view/edit this section ]
    Whiteboard Requests
    Videoconferencing
    Videoconferencing Description
    Room Set Information
 

Additional Presenters

[ view/edit this section ]
    n/a

Return to your Presenter Menu