Archive for June, 2005

Google Tutor & Advisor: Tips, Techniques and Advice for Google Users

Tuesday, June 21st, 2005

Google Tutor & Advisor: Tips, Techniques and Advice for Google Users

A cool resource I found on the eContent blog at http://spaces.msn.com/members/econtent/

Taking The Wikipedia To The Next Level

Tuesday, June 21st, 2005

Taking The Wikipedia To The Next Level

Exciting visionary ideas!

Learning Communities And Educational Technology: Part I > April 1, 2005

Monday, June 20th, 2005

Learning Communities And Educational Technology: Part I > April 1, 2005

Looks like a great article on using educational technology to support professional learning communities… a topic I’ve found myself speaking on at the OCDE.

The Blogger Problem

Friday, June 17th, 2005

The Blogger Problem

I’ve been asked about this pesky “next blog” button often, and Will has written an interesting response with some suggested solutions.

Resources for St. John’s, St. Paul’s, and Salem

Thursday, June 16th, 2005

Welcome and Pre-Assessment (5 min)

Standards Aligned Resources (20 min)
California Learning Resources Network – http://www.clrn.org/home/
Grade Level Gold – http://www.gradelevelgold.com
kitZu – http://www.kitzu.org
SCORE – http://www.score.k12.ca.us/

Online Tools and Services (20 min)
Google Services and Tools – http://www.google.com/options/
FURL – http://www.furl.net
Blogger – http://www.blogger.com
Flickr – http://www.flickr.com
Bloglines – http://www.bloglines.com

Other Resources (Time Permitting)
See reverse side of handout!

Internet Safety (10 min)
Rules for Online Safety – http://www.safekids.com/kidsrules.htm
GetNetWise – http://kids.getnetwise.org/
Kid Safety on the Internet – http://www.ou.edu/oupd/kidsafe/inet.htm
The NetSmartz Workshop – http://www.netsmartz.org/

Google Maps inspire creativity

Wednesday, June 15th, 2005

Google Maps inspire creativity

This is why I mention Google Maps in my Online Resources for teachers sessions.

iPodSoft – iStory Creator

Tuesday, June 14th, 2005

iPodSoft – iStory Creator

Teachers (or students for that matter) can use this to create learning games for iPod.

Digital divide narrows

Tuesday, June 14th, 2005

Digital divide narrows

An exciting headline at least!

Going to the Games, Learning, and Society Conference

Monday, June 13th, 2005

Well, it was expensive, but it is all aranged… I will be attending the Games, Learning, and Society Conference in Madison, Wisconsin next week. I expect this will be even better (or at least more interactive) than the Education Arcade conference in Los Angeles last month.

These are busy and exciting times!

-Mark

MMORPGs as Constructivist Learning Environments: A Proposed Abstract for a Presentation

Monday, June 13th, 2005

I expect that as my research becomes more focused on this topic, so will my blog posts. I will try to temper this with more from work if time permits.

In the meantime…

The following was written in response to a request for application the faculty chair of the Ph.D. in Education program at Walden University sent out to solicit students to speak about their research at the residency this summer. It felt very good to throw together this proposal tonight, so I thought I’d share it here. If nothing else, those who are interested might find it. ;)

Multiplayer Online Role Playing Games show a great deal of potential as constructivist learning environments; they provide context for learning, opportunities for inquiry, and frameworks for cooperative learning. There is little doubt that a good deal of incidental learning is taking place in these games, but the benefits, drawbacks, and issues surrounding their use for intentional learning in formal education are not well understood.

Mark Wagner is currently working toward completing KAM II: Human Development, but has also explored this topic in previous coursework. In EDUC-8437 -  DATA ANAL. IN ED RESEARCH he studied teacher perceptions of multiplayer online role-playing games. In EDUC-8813 -  MANAGEMENT OF TECH FOR EDUC he wrote about the management issues related to use of the games in formal education. For KAM II, he is investigating the relationship between constructivist theories of cognitive development and such digital game-based learning. For his dissertation, he plans a Delphi study to explore the potential applications of multiplayer online role playing games in education.

Mark’s research is built upon the seminal theories of Jean Piaget, the influential work of Piaget’s student Seymour Papert, and the twenty-first century work of educational technologists such as David H. Jonassen. He has also tapped into the contemporary publications of digital game-based learning enthusiasts such as Marc Prensky, James Paul Gee, and Clark Aldrich. In addition, he has become familiar with the work of other graduate students in the field, such as Nick Yee, Constance Steinkuehler, Kurt Squire, and those at the MIT Comparative Media Studies Department working on the educationarcade.org project.

This brief presentation will begin by establishing the broad themes of this research and how they might be applied in formal education. This will be followed by an illustration of how Walden coursework and the KAM writing process allowed Mark to explore and build upon these themes.