Archive for February, 2005

Moblog test two

Monday, February 28th, 2005

This is my second test. It should self publish.

moblog test

Monday, February 28th, 2005

This is a test of moblogging with blogger.

-Mark

Closed Escrow

Saturday, February 26th, 2005

Well, I’ve discovered self hosting through blogger, and so I’ve closed escrow on a new blog. I may still do a good deal of remodeling and renaming, though.

My old blog can still be found at the URL below.

http://spaces.msn.com/members/markwagner/

However, you may be here because you tried to access my old static web sites. These can still be accessed (for the most part) at the URLs below.

Mark.Wagner.Name
MarkWagner.Info
MarkWagner.Org
MarkWagner.us

For the time being, this site will replace ALL of the above.

-Mark

HYPERION: THE MOVIE – rumors and reality

Saturday, February 26th, 2005

HYPERION: THE MOVIE – rumors and reality

This is the best news I’ve read in a long time! Hyperion on the big screen?

Google Maps on Safari!

Saturday, February 26th, 2005

Google Maps on Safari!

Sweet! Came to me from the Google blog feed at http://www.google.com/googleblog/atom.xml

Assessment of appropriate technology use in teaching and learning

Wednesday, February 23rd, 2005

A response to a colleagues’ post in class at Walden…

And their work would be evaluated to determine if they are using technology appropriately

I think assessment of teaching with technology is at least as problematic as assessing student use of technology. How does one account for innovation and then integration of new technologies?

The situation we are in now, where teachers and students are being assessed by outmoded means (such as paper and pencil multiple choice tests completed by the individual in a timed environment) can be easily recreated over and over in the coming years.

For instance, the Newport-Mesa Unified School District, where I worked until very recently, established a Technology Scope and Sequence and High School Technology Graduation Requirements a couple of years ago, but if teachers were being assessed on their ability to meet he scope and sequence and graduate students who met the HSTGRs then those teachers who have adopted project based learning with iLife (iPhoto, iMovie, Garage Band, etc on the Mac), with the handheld learning environment (FreeWrite, Sketchy, PicoMap etc on the Palm), or the read/write web (blogs, RSS, FURL etc) would be judged failures.

Even the state of California Technology Assistance Project is only overtly concerned with Word processing, Spreadsheets, databases, email, and the internet. The multimedia applications and web based workflow collaboration are nowhere to be found.

So, how do we assess appropriate use of technology in teaching and learning? And, how do we ensure that our assessments evolve to include current innovations?

-Mark

Integrate technology into the curriculum: short and long term

Wednesday, February 23rd, 2005

Written in response to a class prompt…

What steps might you (or your organization) take, both long and short term, to help your school more effectively integrate technology into the curriculum? Create a short plan of action for how you may go about helping facilitate the technology integration process in your context.

I work as an Educational Technology Coordinator at the Orange County Department of Education, so I will approach this prompt from the perspective of how the county can help schools and districts to more effectively integrate technology into the curriculum.

Short Term

1. Refocus our staff development services (both in our labs and in our custom training program) from application specific topics to curriculum integration specific topics. (For instance, on the Mac platform, instead of specific iPhoto and iMovie classes, we might offer "iLife projects for high School English Language Arts".) Traditionally we offer week long summer institutes for teachers, and I think this is an ideal time to implement and pilot this change. I have already begun the needs assessment for this change, but this will also require that a good deal of time is devoted to instructional design. We may need to recruit a new cadre of trainers better qualified for this sort of integration training.

2. Infuse these new integration efforts not only with ways to integrate existing technologies into existing pedagogies, but also with ways to alter pedagogy to be more context-embedded, inquire-driven, and socially-negotiated in keeping with the need to help students develop 21st Century Skills such as digital literacy, inventive thinking, effective communication, and high productivity. http://www.ncrel.org/engauge/skills/skills.htm

3. Provide consulting services to help schools and districts build their own capacity to do all of the above.

4. Provide additional consulting services to help schools and districts to implement hardware, software, and curricular technology standards (including a systematic process for revision, updates, and replacements) in order to support the above.

Long Term

1. Our department does a good job of staying on top of new and current trends in the integration of educational technologies into the curriculum. However, there is no formal system in place. While a formal system may not be required, we must remain committed to seeking out and exploring new applications of new technologies if we are to continue to inspire innovation in education. This will be costly in terms of relatively risky investments in conferences, correspondence with experts, equipment, and the time to needed to experiment.

2. In addition to exploring new technologies, we must also allocate resources to exploring new pedagogies and new school structures (in terms of physical layout, distance learning, and schedules – for classes, school days, and school years) made possible by the new technologies.

3. It is my firm belief that the current public education system must reinvent itself for the 21st Century (which includes of course contingencies for continued reinvention) or else be replaced by private efforts, perhaps at the cost of tremendous societal growth pains, such as the loss of many culturally unifying traditions and a greater digital divide between the have’s and have not’s. If we are to avoid this, hybrid organizations, such as the county office, which have the resources, vision, and flexibility to help schools and districts to adapt must lead the way. This is what keeps me up at night, and what gets me up in the morning. I want to be a part of this change.

-Mark

Tech is for girls

Tuesday, February 22nd, 2005

Tech is for girls

This is cool. A conference for introducing 5th to 8th grade girls to technologies… inclduing blogs. Came to me on an “as it happens” Google Alert.

No anonymous comments… planning a move

Sunday, February 20th, 2005
Many of my readers have already shared their frustration with the MSN Passport login required to post comments on this blog.

The following post by a fellow MSN blogger explains the situation well.
http://spaces.msn.com/members/wphowell/blog/cns!1p_bzkoardb-8JAm4_bq68mg!126.entry


I am therefore planning a move in the first week of March. I’ll be trying out blogger. I’ve got a template all setup, but I haven’t settled on a few details yet, so I’ll publish the address of the site and the feed here once I’ve settled those issues.

In the meantime, thanks to those who have been reading this site or my feed.

-Mark

Ways to use weblogs in education

Sunday, February 20th, 2005

Ways to use weblogs in education

Posted by Anne Davis on 10/5/04; 9:54:05 – but I wasn’t on board yet… and it’s always worth linking to. Ways to use weblogs in education. ‘Nuff said.